February 2015 Newsletter

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W.I.T.S FEBRUARY 2015 NEWSLETTER

American Heart Month


AND THE WINNERS ARE…

We had 2 winners get a FREE CREDIT on their renewal fee of
$75.00.

FREE RENEWAL WINNERS:

  • Darren
    Corona – Staten Island, NY
  • Sharon
    Privett – Whitwell, TN

Thank you all very much for your input on how we can do more
to make you and your fitness careers shine.

We had 130 (2) CEC courses to give away in a
package. The following 10 individuals won a package of “13” courses
to develop their business skills and make their income soar in 2015.

Free 2 Credit Package of 13 Courses:

  • Joy
    Wiltshire – Breinigsville, PA
  • Mary
    Sydney – Macomb, MI
  • Robert
    Wiggs – El Paso, TX
  • Harold
    Caldwell Jr. – Las Cruces, NM
  • Rachel
    Bateman – Charleston, SC
  • Marcy
    Mione – Sandpoint, ID
  • Karen
    Cimino- Manchester, CT
  • Theresa
    Secor – Madison, OH
  • Kelly
    McFarland – Beaverton, OR
  • Chris Link
    – Virginia Beach, VA

We do these survey’s occasionally to improve what we can do
for you. Expect a new one next month from Alpine. That survey will be
used in our accreditation preparation of our NCCA International
Credential of Excellence (ICE) application. Fun prizes will be included
as well so be on the lookout.


Love Hurts: Understanding Broken Heart
Syndrome

by Michelle Matte, MSEd, CSCS

Love Sick

if you have ever gone through a bad breakup, or lost
someone who was near and dear to you, you can likely recall the physical
reaction you experienced. A tightening of the chest, a sick feeling in
the pit of your stomach, difficulty breathing, nausea, weakness and heart
palpitations are all symptoms of Broken Heart Syndrome. In extreme cases,
the physical changes that take place when you are heartbroken can become
life threatening, leading to a heart attack or stroke.

Heart of Glass

According to researchers at Johns Hopkins Heart and
Vascular Institute, unlike a heart attack which kills heart cells, broken
heart syndrome is caused by adrenaline and other hormones that stun the
heart. Patients who are hospitalized with BHS often present with low
blood pressure and shock, which are also symptoms of heart attack. The
heart may temporarily become enlarged and pump poorly, similar to
congestive heart failure. But in broken heart syndrome, there is no
evidence of damage to arteries, as typifies heart disease.


Stress and the Psychology of the Heart

by Michelle Matte, MSEd, CSCS

Stress Skills

Most of us accept stress as a necessary evil that is a
part of the American lifestyle. But living under stress day in and day
out can lead to heart disease. According to the American Psychological
Association, prolonged stress can contribute to high blood pressure and
circulatory problems, and if stress makes you angry and irritable, you
are more likely to have heart disease or even a heart attack. The APA
notes that stress may be a more important risk factor than smoking, high
blood pressure or high cholesterol. A 2013 study published in “ARYA
Atherosclerosis” concluded that more attention must be paid to
psychological factors that contribute to heart disease.

It’s In Our DNA

According to researchers at Johns Hopkins Heart and
Vascular Institute, unlike a heart attack which kills heart cells, broken
heart syndrome is caused by adrenaline and other hormones that stun the
heart. Patients who are hospitalized with BHS often present with low
blood pressure and shock, which are also symptoms of heart attack. The
heart may temporarily become enlarged and pump poorly, similar to
congestive heart failure. But in broken heart syndrome, there is no
evidence of damage to arteries, as typifies heart disease.


February Special – $95 OFF Any
W.I.T.S. Online Course*!


Gut Feeling: How Digestive Health
Affects Your Heart

by Michelle Matte, MSEd, CSCS

Your Second Brain

We all recognize the link between good nutrition and a
healthy heart. But new research is revealing the important role played by
the digestive system in regulating your mood, thoughts, decision making
and disease risk. Dubbed the “second brain,” your gut has over 100
million neurons, called the enteric nervous system, or ENS. According to
Dr. Michael Gershon, professor and chair of pathology and cell biology at
Columbia University, the ENS works on its own, without any input from the
brain. Not only does it control the movement and absorption of food in
your intestines, but it communicates with the brain, sending signals that
affect feeling, memory, learning and decision making.

Heart Health and Digestion

The prevalence of CVD is world-wide, and CVD is the primary
cause of world death, making up 31 percent of all causes of death
globally. The World Health Organization, or WHO, notes that over three
quarters of deaths from CVD occur in low- and middle-income countries.
This last statistic is of interest when you consider that the United
States is categorized as an affluent country, yet CVD is rampant in the
US.


Heart Disease: America’s Killer

by Michelle Matte, MSEd, CSCS

The Numbers Say It All​

For decades, Cardiovascular Disease, or CVD, has been the
number one killer in the United States. According to the American Heart
Association, over 800,000 Americans die each year from CVD. A 2011 study
published in the American Journal of Public Health found that changing lifestyle
behaviors is a highly effective way to reduce the risk of CVD.
Participants in the study reduced their CVD risk by 65 percent through
smoking cessation, increased physical activity, moderation of alcohol
consumption and consuming a healthy diet.

It’s a Global Problem​

The prevalence of CVD is world-wide, and CVD is the primary
cause of world death, making up 31 percent of all causes of death
globally. The World Health Organization, or WHO, notes that over three
quarters of deaths from CVD occur in low- and middle-income countries.
This last statistic is of interest when you consider that the United
States is categorized as an affluent country, yet CVD is rampant in the
US.


When Dreams Become Goals, Miracles
Happen!

Dreams vs Goals

The difference between living the life of your dreams and
only dreaming about it often boils down to clarity. For example, you may
dream of living in a spacious house in an upscale neighborhood, driving a
nice car and taking luxurious vacations in exotic locations. But unless
you can clarify your dream life in terms of time, dollars and the steps
you must take to attain it, it will remain in the dream zone.

Moving Out of the Dream Zone

To realize your dream, begin with some research. What is the
median market price of homes in the neighborhood you want to live in? How
much would the mortgage payment be? What would the monthly payment
and insurance fees be on that dream car? How much will it cost to take
your dream vacation? Breaking your dreams down in terms of dollars lends
clarity and gives you a foundation upon which to structure your goals.