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Introduction to Dumbbell Training

Believe it or not, dumbbell training has been around since ancient Greece. They used stone or metal that was carved to include a handle and weighed between 4 and 20 lbs. They were called halteres. The term dumbbell, however, is believed to have originated in England (Hedrick, 2020). Various types of dumbbells can be used with a single or a pair of dumbbells in a bent over row, bench press and more.

These include adjustable, fixed, and selectorized. no matter what style you use, dumbbells have many benefits, and these include:

Practical Advantages

  1. Low Cost
  2. Adaptability
  3. Can be used anywhere
  4. Suited for explosive training
  5. Little training space is required
  6. Can train all muscle groups
  7. Only need a relatively small number of dumbbells
  8. Safer than barbells on specific exercises
  9. Easier for individuals with injuries
  10. Easier to learn than barbell exercises

Physiological Advantages

  1. A more complex motor activity
  2. Opportunity to perform alternating movements
  3. Opportunity to perform single-arm movements
  4. Adds a balance requirement which works core muscles
  5. Stabilizing muscles are more active
  6. Reduces the potential for injury by enhancing joint stability
  7. Increases potential range of motion
  8. Adds variation to the training program (Hedrick, 2020)

Now that you know why using dumbbells is essential in a workout, let us look at how to incorporate them into your program. You can either incorporate dumbbells into an existing program or design a whole new program for your client. Either way, there are some necessary steps you will want to take.

  1. Decide on your philosophy of training.
  2. Establish your client’s goals.
  3. Use scientifically sound information and concrete guidelines (Hint: You can find these in a W.I.T.S. course).
  4. Use the concept of periodization: The practice of dividing training into specific cycles with each cycle targeting a specific physiological adaption.
  5. Incorporate training variables.
  6. Teach proper technique. Technique should always take precedence over intensity.

There are a plethora of dumbbell exercises out there. These dumbbell exercises can work all the major muscles for the full body effect.  Those exercises can work the tricep muscles, upper arms, and develop full range of motion.

Almost any exercise your client is doing on a machine can be done with a set of dumbbells. Add in simple variations on each exercise, and you have just quadrupled the movements you can do. You can work on muscle isolating movements like bicep curls or compound movements that work multiple muscles at one time, like squats. You can even put the two together and have your client do a squat-bicep curl move.

“This is the interesting part of designing training programs because it is part science and part art—art in the sense that you can use your creativity to design what you believe is the best approach to improving athletic performance. Although the art aspect provides room for creativity, the vast majority of a training program should be based on science” (Hedrick, 2020)

So take a look at the programs you are designing and ask yourself where can I add in some dumbbell training? Want to know more about programming, various exercises for upper body, weight loss aspects and more? Sign up now for the Introduction to Dumbbell Training in the W.I.T.S. Store

Check out this great Infographic about guidelines of resistance training

Stop by the W.I.T.S. store to check out the Introduction to Dumbbell Training course and our other C.E.C. offerings. Check back in often as we are beginning to develop a new line of courses specific to trainers’ current needs.

References

Hedrick, Allen, (2020).  Dumbbell training. (2nd ed.). Human Kinetics.

Presenters Bio

Martha Swirzinski, Ed.D.Martha Swirzinski

Martha holds an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction and a master’s degree in Kinesiology. She has over 25 years of experience in teaching exercise science, health education, and personal training. She teaches in higher education and develops courses worldwide for various organizations. She has been with W.I.T.S. in multiple roles, including mentoring online programs, course development, webinars, and teaching since 2009.

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At Home Workout Success

Bodyweight Strength Training

By Abby Eastman MS Ed, Professional Fitness Trainer and Entrepreneur

A couple months into our newish normal during Corona Virus shutdowns I was missing the gym, my friends, the energy of teaching a classes and the encouragement of my gym family. I knew I needed to get into a better routine and figure out a way to navigate the roads ahead.  In our area of the country we still have shutdowns and not everything is open. And although it has been tough not having my normal space, toys and connectivity with clients, adjusting to a new normal has had a lot of perks! I have more time to exercise on my own and experiment with new full body workouts and pop into my favorite group classes I can’t normally attend via zoom.  I have even brushed up on my video training skills while gaining new clients virtually.

Even though heading to your favorite gym for a daily workout or train might not be a possibility right now, here are a few tips for setting up a home workout space.

First: When at all possible stick to your regular full body workout time and help your clients do the same. Are you a morning exerciser? Great – schedule yourself in at the time you would usually hit the gym! Work with clients to help them keep their regularly scheduled time even if it has to be a remote session. Having a sense of routine in this uncertain time can help us mentally and physically stay in shape.

Second: Trainers, explore what new options you can offer clients virtually. Reach out to current and past clients to share your new services.  You can provide custom, home-based programs on the equipment they have available. Try scheduling a free 15-minute virtual session to give them a jumpstart. Boot camp, small groups, private sessions, outdoor sessions and pop up workouts are just a few options you can offer if you haven’t started already. Share with clients the benefits of booking additional check-in sessions the keep their momentum.  It will keep them accountable and connected while building your business.

Additionally, this is a wonderful opportunity for us as personal trainers to break out a new fitness plan and get out of our own training rut.  You could try a new workout routine app, hop in a fellow trainer’s virtual class, or breakout those old workout DVD’s. Have you been meaning to try kickboxing, martial arts, or yoga? Been eyeing a new certification or continuing education course? Now is a great time to experiment with activities you may not normally get the chance to from the comfort of your own home. Bonus: now you can have your AC adjusted just how you like it! Clients will enjoy the spice you bring to their sessions.

Third: Create your space!  You do not need a lot of space but having dedicated area can help you stick to your routine. Great fitness at home workout equipment options include:

  • Free weights
  • Kettle bells
  • Resistance bands
  • TRX
  • Bosu
  • Stability Ball
  • Step

These items do not take up a lot of space and can make for a great total body routine whether building muscle, bodyweight exercises or anything with fitness at home.

If you have extra space, search through your local online yard sales and gym equipment sales. Many sell refurbished gym equipment for great prices. Grab your favorite cardio machine and pair it with a bench, corner cable unit and you will have a whole new area to look forward to.  Challenge yourself to stick with your workouts and reward yourself with new toys.

Trainers create your virtual space for optimal training by:

  • Taping off a pre-determined space for filming. Place an “X” where your computer or camera stand goes and a square of tape around the perimeter that is within the viewing area you need to stay within while filming.  Makes it easy to jump into a session quickly and ensures clients can see you!
  • Try an adjustable camera stand. You can easily adjust the viewing area so the client can see your form while standing, seated or reclined.
  • Be sure the lighting is pointing toward you.  Lights shining in from the side or behind you make you look like a dark shadow. It also makes it hard for clients to see you.
  • Set the stage you created with all equipment clients will need so it is visible to them when they sign on.
  • Create a clean background behind you that is simple.
  • Wear bright colors!  You will show up best on camera in bright, solid colors.
  • If you are filming at your facility, show off a familiar space to help clients feel at home.
  • Welcome clients just like you would at your facility and invite all types of strength training, body weight, cardio, HIIT exercise requests if possible.

While this may not be the way we are accustomed to working with clients there are plenty of ways we can continue to reach people virtually.  Many clients are finding virtual workouts with a personal trainer easier to attend. Clients can stay in the comfort of their home or office, kids can be in the background and they can skip traffic!

Share with us what ways you are reaching clients; we’d love to hear what new tricks you’ve learned!

Check out our new workshops @ https://www.witseducation.com/fit/store-category/pre-sale/ with all new full body workouts that are on pre-sale in August.  Use this link to get all 3 for this special price of $195.00  https://www.witseducation.com/fit/store-category/pre-sale/  and check out the PRE-SALE special or use the PROMO CODE minus20cert to get any individual course for 20% off individually.

Want to talk some more?  Join our BLOGCAST August 11 @ 1pm EST.  Send a request to register to jdelvec@witseducation.com

 

Presenters Bio

Abby Eastman, Ms Ed, ACSM C-EP, ERYT-200, CHWC

Abby holds a BS and Ms Ed in Exercises Science. She has over 20 years of experience teaching health education, group exercise, yoga, and personal training. She has taught at the university and community college levels and directed a variety of community fitness programs. She has been working with W.I.T.S. in various rolls including mentoring online programs, continuing education creation, leading webinars, and teaching in-person certifications since 2004. She believes everyone deserves to feel and live their best life and is passionate partnering with others to help them get there.

Abby Eastman MSEd, ACSM Exercise Physiologist/EIM II, CHWC, E-RYT200

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Exercise Immunology 101: Considerations for the Fitness Professional

Outdoor Exercise

by Joseph Giandonato, MBA, MS, CSCS

As the COVID-19 pandemic transforms our society and a myriad of industries, including our own, concerns about safely continuing to pursue fitness goals have emerged as fitness instructors and the clients they support weigh the risks versus rewards during these unprecedented times.

Nationwide, cases have continued to surge in spite of attempts to temper the proliferation of the virus as government organizations at the federal, state, and local levels work to strike a delicate balance between curating the health of citizens and restoring the economy. Measures such as abridging capacity and hours of operation of multiple fitness and recreational facilities, including temporarily shuttering venues and suspending services, while disruptive, are intended to keep us healthy.

Long term held beliefs about exercise adversely impacting immune system is the functioning has been corroborated by a landmark review authored by Gleeson (2007).  The review demonstrated that the inflammatory response of a singular bout of intense and prolonged exercise mirrors that of infection, sepsis, or trauma, triggering the release of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor, and interleukins 6 and 10, C-recreative protein, and interleukin-1-receptor antagonists that, in concert, influence the augmentation of circulating white blood cells, known as leukocytes.

Hormonal secretion following an intense bout of exercise induced activity, specifically epinephrine and cortisol blunt the secretion of leukocytes and impair cell mediated immunity and inflammation, thereby increasing the susceptibility of infection and modulating the morbidity and severity of illness. Previous research established a strong correlation between a exercise dose and upper respiratory tract infection among humans. Health fitness exercise bouts consisting of a stimuli that is too novel, too frequent, too intense, and too voluminous to which the subject is accustomed have been found to increase pathogen infection risk. There has been a considerable amount of studies that have demonstrated the temporary ergolytic effects of acute exercise on immune system functioning, ranging from three to 72 hours post-exercise. Researchers and health and exercise professionals have coined this period of time characterized by temporary suppression of the immune system as “the open window”.

To simultaneously curtail infection risk and facilitate the achievement of improved fitness industry qualities or biomotor skills, one must account for life stress, energy availability, sleep duration and quality, travel, and exposure to environmental or climate extremes beyond the exercise frequency, intensity, volume, and type, according to Professor Neil Walsh, a faculty member at Bangor University in the United Kingdom, who outlined recommendations for athletes to maintain immune health.

Key guidelines among the few dozen presented are summarized below for personal trainers in working with potential clients:

  1. Undulating training stress throughout training cycles and weeks
  2. Incorporating active recovery sessions
  3. Incrementally increasing volume and intensity, but no more than 5-10% per week
  4. Minimize unnecessary life stress
  5. Monitor, manage, and quantify all forms of stress, both psychological and physical
  6. Aim for more than seven hours of sleep each night; nap during the daytime, if able to, or necessary
  7. Monitor sleep duration and quality; ensure darkness at bedtime
  8. Be cognizant of reduced exercise capacity in hotter, more humid environments
  9. Permit acclimatization to changes in, or extreme weather
  10. Uphold optimal or recommended nutrition, hydration, and hygiene practices
  11. Do not engage in extreme dieting; be sure to consume a well balanced diet
  12. Discontinue training if experiencing symptoms “below the neck” as they could be indicative of an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI)
  13. Avoid sick and/or symptomatic people
  14. Practice good hand hygeine

Exercise evokes a hormetic effect, or dose-dependent response, meaning that moderate exposure can be beneficial, but amounts either too minimal or excessive can cause harm. This is precisely why exercise physiology scholars and health and medical professionals alike have embraced the mantra of “exercise is medicine” in recent years. Too little exercise results in greater cardiometabolic disease (aka conditions of “disuse”) risk, whereas too much exercise results in greater injury or illness (aka conditions of “overuse”). As mentioned in an earlier post, “acute singular bouts of exercise at or above lactate threshold (55% of VO2max among untrained individuals; 85% of VO2max among trained individuals) for periods of up to, or more than one hour, contributed to temporary immunosuppression. Regular exercise among individuals has shown to yield immunoprotective benefits. The takeaway here should be, exercise during this time should be regarded as a tool to reinvigorate and recover, not bury and deliberately fatigue. Sparingly perform sets to failure and limit volume at or beyond lactate threshold.”

In summary, immune system performance and overall health can be achieved through regular exercise. During times of greater illness transmission and infection risk, fitness professionals, athletes, and enthusiasts must practice both diligence and vigilance to ward off foreign pathogens. Fitness goals should be targeted and inputs, such as time and effort should be quantified to calculate training load. Rest and recovery should be as equally, if not greater prioritized.

References

  • Gleeson, M. (2007). Immune function in sport and exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 103 (2), 693-699.
  • Kakanis, M.W., Peake, J., Brenu, E.W., Simmonds, M., Gray, B., Hooper, S.L., & Marshall-Gradisnik, S.M. (2010). Exercise Immunology Review, 16, 119-137.
  • Murphy, E.A., Davis, J.M., Carmichael, M.D., Gangemi, J.D., Ghaffar, A., & Mayer, E.P. (2008). Exercise stress increases susceptibility to influenza infection. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 22, (8), 1152-1155.
  • Nieman, D.C. (1994). Exercise, infection, and immunity. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 15, S131-S141
  • Walsh, N.P. (2018). Recommendations to maintain immune health in athletes. European Journal of Sport Science, 18 (6), 820-831.
  • Wong, C., Lai, H., Ou, C., Ho, S., Chan, K., Thach, T., Yang, L., Chau, Y., Lam, T., Hedley, A.J., & Peiris, J.S.M. (2008). Is exercise protective against influenza-associated mortality? PLoS One, 3 (5): e2108.

 

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Fitness Walking

By Dave Johnson

The landscape of the fitness industry has changed dramatically over the past few months. A staple of most communities, fitness facilities have been ordered to close, trainers have been furloughed, and people have openly stated that they aren’t sure if they’ll feel “safe” in facilities when (and if) they reopen.

This, of course, comes at a time where the need to live a healthy life has never been more important. COVID-19 has really raised the focus on public health and, as trainers, we play an integral role in helping people! Consider the co-morbidities most often associated with complications from COVID-19: obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. These are all things that we help people with on a daily basis. We’ve been talking about the importance of battling these conditions for decades but, now that the spotlight is on them, people are taking notice and want to improve. It’s important to note that this includes potential new clients, as well as those who may have suffered from the dreaded “Quarantine 15” weight gain.

The issue facing trainers, however, is clear – how do we train our clients when they are hesitant to come to our facility or, even worse, our facilities are closed? The answer lies in improving and diversify our offerings. Trainers must be innovative and look for ways to help people outside the normal confines of a fitness facility. Both social distancing and outdoor activity are proven ways to minimize the spread of COVID-19, so seeking activities that accomplish both are essential to our success.

Fitness WalkingOne exciting option for trainers is to encourage Fitness Walking. An underrated exercise activity, fitness walking can yield a multitude of benefits for your clients – both new and established. It’s low-impact, provides both physical and mental benefits and, most importantly, can be done virtually anywhere by anyone! W.I.T.S. Fitness Walking course covers proper techniques, skills, and content used in designing, implementing, and evaluating individualized and group programs in fitness walking for a variety of clients and their fitness levels. You’ll learn about nuances such as gait deviation (which can play a huge role in stride rate/length and injury prevention) and how the principles of physical fitness directly relate to fitness walking. You’ll learn about specific flexibility exercises that can benefit walkers and even some basics about proper clothing and footwear! In short, this course will give you the necessary skills to add this style of training to your offerings so you can continue to be profitable during these trying times.

As mentioned earlier, this pandemic has forced us to be innovative and there are some really fun new concepts that have emerged that would pair nicely with fitness walking, such as virtual races. Obviously, given the times, the idea of getting large groups of people together for a 5K, 10K, half- or full-marathon, is one that should remain just that: an idea. Instead, the market for virtual races has exploded since February! There are races of almost any length and many of them have fun (or customizable) themes that award medals and gear much like their physical counterparts. Think about how fun it would be for a new client to have the pride of accomplishing a goal without the usual nerves or hesitation associated with a live event. It could just be what they need to make this a lifelong activity and you’re the perfect trainer to help them get started.

Swing by the W.I.T.S. store to check this course out, as well as our other sport-based CEC offerings. Check back in often as we are beginning to develop a new line of courses specific to the current needs of trainers.

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Nutritional Concepts

By Dave Johnson

Picture this: it’s been a great workout with a relatively new client. They’ve pushed themselves hard in each of their workouts but they’re not quite seeing the results they had hoped for. The client finishes their last set and you’re right in the middle of your concluding conversation when the question pops out: “what should I be eating?”

Sound familiar? This is a scene that plays out all across the personal training stratosphere fairly regularly. The vast majority of personal trainers are questioned about dietary advice at some point in their careers and, when we look at the data, it’s not all that surprising!

The obesity epidemic in the United States is well-documented. Over the past 20 years, the rate of obesity in adults has grown from 30.5% to 42.4% and, when you include the number of Americans who are overweight, that percentage grows to 71.6%[1]! If you’re curious about the trends in your own state, here’s a link to the CDC’s Obesity Prevalence trends from 2011 through 2018. (more…)

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Mastering Your Financial Future as a Fitness Professional

You set a goal to be a Certified Personal Trainer.  You wanted to attend the best fitness school on the market to make a difference in lives. You worked hard memorizing the human anatomy, programming for cardio and resistance training and injury prevention, to name a few categories. You spent hours interning how to interact with clients, professional etiquette and program progression. Now it’s time to get out there and get your future started!

You’ve landed a personal training job with the company you have admired for years. You are dressed in the fancy attire, you have all of your new client paperwork organized and a smile on your face. You are ready to train but, now what?

You need to find clients! Where do you find them? How do you approach them? Once you get their attention, how do you convince them they need to hire you?

If you find yourself asking these questions, you are not alone. There are various ways to approach the final result of obtaining a new client. Mastering Your Financial Future as a Fitness Professional is an excellent course that will help you learn these skills and start your journey as a certified personal trainer on the right foot.

Here are some quick insightful sources.

As a sample of what is included in this 2 CEC course, let’s take a look at a list of common mistakes that trainers make which can often lead to retention issues!

  1. Giving cookie cutter workouts: Don’t make the mistake of thinking your clients don’t know when you’re slacking. They can go online if they want a workout available to the public. Know your client and design their journey!
  2. Not obtaining a medical history: During the assessment, you will find out a little about their medical history but not all of it. Know who you are working with so you can provide the most appropriate modifications.
  3. Poor record keeping: This is one important way to keep your client motivated and hold them accountable. They may physically see and feel changes in their body and mind but showing them their accomplishments on paper can be eye opening. The other side to this is your backup if they are not achieving results. This is proof that you are doing everything on your end. The accountability falls on them to do what they need to do when you are not around.
  4. Pushing a client too far too fast: Again, now your clients. Some may look like they can perform difficult movements from the start, but for one reason or another are unable to. You need to know what they are capable of and introduce movements at the appropriate times.
  5. Poor communication: This goes without saying. Most problems in life are due to a lack of communication. Results happen when you and your client can focus 100% on the goal at hand.
  6. Not giving 100% attention to your client: When you are with a client, you should be with them and them only! Not chatting with other members, clients or co-workers, not on your phone and certainly not focusing on your own workouts! They are paying for your time and deserve every second of it.
  7. Going beyond your scope of practice: Stick to what you know. You wouldn’t want someone giving you the wrong information, so don’t do it to your clients. If you don’t know the solution, inform them you will figure it out. You can also refer your client to a more appropriate contact. Keep a list of what you don’t know and make it a point to learn something new every day.
  8. Specializing too early: Give yourself some time to find your niche. Don’t choose an area to focus on just because it’s popular this month. Make it a point to be familiar with new trends, but don’t become the expert on all of them. You will find your niche naturally.

Overall, knowing your strengths and weaknesses, staying inside your scope of practice and listening to what the client wants are some important keys to success. It’s your job as a trainer to figure out what the client needs, and this will come with time. The road to becoming a successful personal trainer can be a long one and it’s essential to have the best tools and tips to help you along the way. Mastering Your Financial Future as a Fitness Professional is the perfect course to get that journey started.

Register during the month of March and, as a special offer just for you, receive 20% off of your CEC courses!

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You Finally Got Your Personal Trainer Certification: Now What?

Getting your personal trainer certification is a big step toward a bright future as a fitness professional. Studying for and passing your exam and getting CPR certified demand a lot of time and effort, but certification is just the beginning. To make the most of your personal trainer certification and turn it into a sustainable career, you need to take some additional steps toward professionalism. 

Lifestyle Fitness Coaching Certification Professional holding a clipboard

5 Steps Toward Becoming a Successful Certified Fitness Professional

The following five steps will get you started on the right path toward a successful career as a Certified Personal Trainer:

  1. Get hands-on experience: Some newly certified trainers already have a background in fitness. Some have academic degrees in exercise science and related fields, and others have backgrounds in athletics or bodybuilding. Whether you have a background in fitness or not, working with clients requires additional skills. Consider enrolling in the W.I.T.S. internship program. As an intern, you gain experience working one-on-one with clients, and you get a glimpse of the fitness business from the other side of the front desk. 
  1. Purchase Liability Insurance: Physical activities of any type come with inherent risks for injury. While the benefits of fitness activities outweigh the risks, there is always the chance that something can go wrong. Even if you work in a gym or studio that provides coverage for its employees, it is wise to protect yourself with additional insurance. The good news is that liability insurance for personal trainers is remarkably inexpensive. After all, an important part of your job is to protect your clients from injury, so the risk is relatively low. Follow this link to find affordable liability insurance.
  1. Form an LLC: A legal liability corporation (LLC) is a legal entity that protects business owners and their families from lawsuits, creditors and other business liabilities that may arise. Unlike a sole proprietorship, with an LLC, only the assets of your business are at risk — your personal assets and those of your family are protected, should your business fail or fall on hard times. An LLC is easy to form and inexpensive to register. There are many online resources to help you form an LLC. 
  1. Define your niche: There is nothing wrong with taking on a broad range of clients, but narrowing your niche can help you establish a solid reputation as a fitness expert. Certain clients may be outside your scope of expertise, while focusing on a specific population can enable you to grow professionally while having a positive impact on the lives of your clients. Youth, older adults, pregnant and postpartum women, body builders and figure competitors — the list goes on and on. Choose your niche and grow a robust clientele to promote your business. 
  1. Establish your brand: Once you establish yourself as a certified fitness professional,  expand your client base and cement your expertise by branding yourself online. Professional posts on social media, a professional website and Facebook page and maybe even a YouTube channel are great ways to reach an ever-growing audience and expand your business. Use your imagination to create a solid brand image that reaches the masses. 

Find Your Niche and Build Your Fitness Career

Build your skills and knowledge and become a top personal trainer. Choose from any of our professional fitness courses for skills training and certification:

Join the W.I.T.S. family of industry leaders today, and build your career as a fitness professional on a solid foundation.

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Nutritional / Dietary Certifications

Recently I had a club owner ask for assistance as he reviewed all of the Nutrition and/or Diet Certifications out there. He is looking to qualify his 100 plus trainers to provide nutritional counseling to clients.  Here is my response to him, which is what I have always believed. I hope this helps clarify the limits of your true scope of practice as a Certified Personal Trainer.

 

“Thank you for reaching out to us.  We do not have a dietary certification, nor do we intend to go down that path.  I realize there is a lot of money in it for both of us, and it is tempting to offer a Dietary Certification like a lot of other groups.  The reality is that Dietary Counseling is not truly in our industry’s wheelhouse.  We do have all kinds of nutritional workshops available with respected authors, to help educate trainers to work with all age groups.

“My reasoning is based simply on staying in our respected professional lanes.  Dietary Certifications from other groups are treading into illegal waters with weight loss credentialing, in my opinion.  There is huge liability in acknowledging trainers as credible prescribers of diets.  A Nutritional Certification is really out of the realm of a personal trainer’s scope of practice. It gives trainers false hopes of knowing  exactly what to do with a client in this area.  

“What we all should do is to network with Registered Dietitians who have the depth of knowledge and official license to be safe and effective.  Teaching trainers superficially to know just enough to prescribe a diet is dangerous.  I would respectfully share that it can get them/you sued.  There are so many variables to consider when prescribing a diet which include medications, medical issues, herb use by the clients and much more.  That is why a Registered Dietician is the safer business choice.  At that point you can network with many of them and send clients back and forth for the best results for the client.  

“Bottom line is that Registered Dietitians are not fitness professionals and they need you as much as you need them for clients’ results and business growth.

“I hope we can network and talk soon on many levels.

Jay”

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Lifecycle of a Personal Trainer: the high cost of low skills training

At one time, personal trainers had the coolest job around, and anyone who had their own personal trainer was ranked among the beautiful people. It was also a lucrative and viable career path for fitness professionals who had enough knowledge and charisma to attract well-heeled clients and help them reach their goals. 

That all changed when gyms began to put the hammer down on freelancers and hired their own trainers at low wages, keeping the lion’s share of revenues for themselves. Over time, that business model all but destroyed personal training as a sustainable career path and caused gym owners to shoot themselves in the foot with a costly cycle of employee training and turnover. 

The below infographic illustrates the typical Lifecycle of the average personal trainer:

Lifecycle of a Personal Trainer

The High Cost of Turnover

Low conversions, low client retention rates, dissatisfied customers and high trainer turnover all cost gym owners enormous amounts of money each year.

These important metrics should be applied to evaluate the performance of any gym’s personal training program:

  • The annual turnover rate for personal trainers runs between 80-90% on average: the optimal employee turnover rate is 10% or less.
  • The minimally acceptable sales conversion rate is 40%, and the optimal rate is 70%. To calculate this metric, divide the number of conversions by the number of prospects a trainer has pitched.
  • The optimal annual client retention rate is 80-90%. Divide the number of clients lost by the number retained.

Ironically, most gym owners don’t bother to track these metrics, and many are unaware of them. For trainers, having quantitative performance metrics would empower them to self-evaluate and monitor their own job performance. Yet in most cases, trainers have no idea what good job performance looks like. 

Factors Contributing to Trainer Turnover

Many people pursue a personal training career because they have a true passion for fitness and want to share it with others. Yet the actual demands of the job can quickly erode a new trainer’s enthusiasm, especially if they don’t feel valued or get the necessary training and support to succeed. 

Factors that contribute to high trainer turnover include:

  • Inadequate job training and poorly defined performance criteria
  • Erratic scheduling, with long hours and split shifts
  • Low pay, with minimal opportunities for advancement
  • Pressure to sell with inadequate sales training and support
  • Burnout from overtraining

The Importance of Skills Training

Most new trainers are hired based on academic credentials, or on a particular brand of certification. Yet during the screening and hiring process, critical skills training and experience is often overlooked. 

This problem partially stems from an antiquated business model that is still applied today. In the early days of fitness clubs, back in the 1970s, very few employees came to the table with any type of credentials or experience, and skills training took place on the job. In most cases, senior employees were responsible for training new hires. Then, as now, gym employee turnover was high.

The old-school model no longer works for several reasons: 

  • Personal training was not offered as a service by most gyms until the early 2000s, but the business model was never updated to include this new employee demographic
  • The job of Personal Trainer demands much higher levels of knowledge and skills than the fitness advisor of old
  • Personal training is a substantial revenue generator, and demands more attention from management to reach its potential
  • Asking a senior trainer to help on-board a new hire imposes an inherent conflict of interest, since trainers often compete for new clients

 

It makes sense to hire new trainers who already possess knowledge, skills and experience. Doing so will increase conversions, elevate client retention rates and reduce costly employee turnover, resulting in higher profits. 

Skills Training for Personal Trainers

If you are serious about building a successful and sustainable fitness career, don’t cut corners on your certification. Get the support, knowledge and hands-on experience you need to succeed with a fitness certification from W.I.T.S.

Advantages of a W.I.T.S. certification include: 

  • Fully NCCA accredited: The only practical skills competency exam in the industry, along with our written exam.
  • Recognized by employers nation-wide: Graduates that perform!
  • Available in colleges, universities and online.
  • Taught by qualified and experienced industry professionals.
  • Internship program available to cement your skills.
  • Friendly customer service and support.
  • Online continuing education at your fingertips.

Find Your Niche and Build Your Fitness Career

Build your skills and knowledge and become a top trainer. Choose from any of our professional fitness course for skills training and certification:

Join the W.I.T.S. family of industry leaders today, and build your fitness career on a solid foundation.