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Why NOW is the Best Time Ever to Become a Personal Trainer!

The profession of Personal Trainer evolved out of the aerobics movement of the late 20th Century, and it quickly became one of the hottest career fields of the new Millennium. In the early 2000s, having a trainer was the epitome of coolness, and clients came in droves to ramp up their street cred. In its early years, personal training attracted mostly healthy young-to-middle aged adults who wanted to drop a few pounds and sculpt a fit physique. 

The Changing PT Market

Fast forward to today, where digital options have flooded the fitness market with online classes and “personal” training that can be done anytime and anywhere, at the client’s leisure. But digital fitness is not and cannot be truly personal, and there is a growing demand for trainers to work one-on-one with an ever-growing client base. 

Clients who need one-on-one personal training include;

  • Older adults seeking to maintain their independence and achieve a better quality of life
  • Prenatal and postpartum moms who want a healthy birth and recovery
  • Obese youth and adults who need personal attention and support to meet their goals
  • Adults who are new to exercise and need to learn the fundamentals
  • Niche populations with condition-specific needs including autism, Parkinson’s, dementia, and multiple other neurological disorders
  • Average people who want to improve their overall health
  • Athletes who want to gain a competitive edge
  • The list goes on and on!

No longer a trend for the well-heeled and beautiful, personal training has become a necessary health care option for people of all ages who want to increase strength and mobility, reduce their risk of metabolic disease, and achieve their best possible quality of life. 

Characteristics of Successful Personal Trainers

While personal trainers are a diverse group that encompasses all ages and ethnicities, most of us share certain attributes. 

You might be a successful personal trainer candidate if you:

  • love physical activity 
  • see fitness as a lifestyle choice
  • believe in the health benefits of fitness
  • empathize with other people and enjoy helping them
  • love learning about fitness and nutrition
  • enjoy a flexible work environment
  • want a gratifying career
  • enjoy being a role model
  • want a career that can open doors of opportunity

Qualifications and How to Become Certified

Personal training is one of the few health professions that does not require an undergraduate or higher degree. You can successfully pass the certification exam with a high school diploma, but you should be prepared for a challenge. Good study skills are a must, and you will have to learn core science principles and be able to apply them. 

While there are many certification programs out there, you should look for one that prepares you to enter the profession with little need for additional training.  W.I.T.S Certified Personal Trainers come from all walks of life, and range from teens to octogenarians. 

W.I.T.S. offers one of the most comprehensive certification programs in the field. Our key features include:

  • NCCA accredited
  • Detailed lectures with qualified instructors, live or online
  • Practical skills training that prepares you to work with clients
  • Internship programs for hands-on experience

When you become W.I.T.S. certified, clients and prospective employers alike know that you have the knowledge and experience to help clients reach their goals, safely and effectively. 

Get Started Today!

If you are ready to join one of the best and most in-demand health professions, look no further than W.I.T.S. Our top-notch instructors, friendly support staff and comprehensive curriculum will provide you with everything you need to succeed as a personal trainer. 

But it doesn’t stop there. We offer continuing education and a variety of supplemental certifications, to keep you growing and learning as you build your career. Apply for our easy payment terms and get started today. With W.I.T.S., your new career as a Certified Personal Trainer is only weeks away!

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Special Pops: Exercise and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

April is National Autism Awareness Month

The incidence of autism in American children has risen dramatically over the past two decades, increasing from one child out of 150 in the year 2000, to one in 59 in 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Those statistics exceed the global average of about one in 161, although the incidence in Western countries worldwide is also on the rise.

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10 Tips for Setting Weight Loss Goals that Really Work

Despite the push for body positivity to combat body shaming, men and women of every age and persuasion are still in quest of the Holy Grail for weight loss and a lean physique, and weight loss continues to be a prime driver for personal training. But as we all know, helping our clients lose weight is one of the biggest challenges we face as fitness professionals. 

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Special Populations: What they are and why you need them

Most personal trainers enter the fitness industry to build a career they love, and to help others realize their potential to lead a fit and healthy lifestyle. Yet many get stuck in the mire of low-paying gym or studio jobs that just don’t cut it in terms of financial rewards and sustainable growth. Oftentimes, the pool of available clients is split among multiple trainers, and new clients are assigned on an “ups” system so that everyone gets a fair shot.

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Trends in Training: Blood Flow Restriction Training for Strength and Hypertrophy

Resistance training for strength and size is a long-established cornerstone of the fitness industry, harkening back centuries. Physical culture and bodybuilding laid the foundation for fitness as we know it today, and many of the same principles apply. However, science trumps tradition where sports and fitness are concerned, and major advances over the past few decades in our knowledge about human physiology have enabled athletes and fitness enthusiasts to grow bigger, faster, stronger and less prone to injury.

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The “Hidden” Benefits of Physical Activity in Youth

Guest Post by Dave Johnson, MS

In 2010, a study published in the International Journal of Obesity sent shockwaves through the public health community. According to the authors of the study, researchers found that 20% of people born between 1966 and 1985 were obese in their 20s, an obesity prevalence milestone not reached by their parents until their 30s or by their grandparents until their 40s or 50s[1].

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Benefits of Exercise for Breast Cancer Recovery

One of the most important, if not THE most important part of recovery from the debilitating side-effects of breast cancer surgery and treatment is correcting postural deviations that are the result of muscle imbalances. We must re-educate the body to restore its’ normal balance. Most of us think of balance as one’s ability to stand without falling, but it actually represents the ability to stabilize and maintain a specific body position. Postural control is defined as the act of maintaining, achieving, or restoring a state of balance during any posture or activity. Therefore, it only makes sense that performing exercises to correct range of motion and postural deviations, while incorporating the aspect of balance, would yield the greatest results! (more…)

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Top 5 Myths — and Facts — About Fitness Training for Older Adults

The over-50 age group is the largest growing demographic in the fitness market, and the demand for personal training among older adults is high. Most older adults have the time and money to hire a trainer, and want the reassurance of safe and effective exercise to achieve and maintain optimal health. Yet many personal  trainers are reluctant to take on older clients, especially those in their 70s and beyond.

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Top 5 Secrets to Weight Loss Success in 2019

A decade or so ago, we all believed that most of our calories should come from whole grains and other carbs, and that eggs and other saturated fats gave us heart disease. We were also sure that longer bouts of cardio would yield greater reductions in body fat. But times have changed, and the jury is in. New research shoots holes in just about everything we thought to be true about successful healthy weight loss. 

Here are five weight loss secrets, backed by clinical evidence, to help you succeed in 2019:

  1. Close the window: We once believed that eating small meals and snacks several times throughout the day was a great way to stabilize blood sugar and silence hunger pangs, thereby facilitating weight loss. Not surprisingly, few people who followed that advice actually lost weight. Giving your body a steady supply of energy negates the need to tap into fat stores. Instead of eating around the clock, practice intermittent fasting by eating all your calories within a six to eight hour window, and stop eating at least three hours before bedtime. Watch your energy soar as your fat melts away. Study
  1. Burst out of your plateau: Long bouts of moderate-intensity cardio lasting 60 to 90 minutes will help you burn fat, but it is a huge time commitment that most people cannot sustain. Burst training, aka interval training, speeds up fat loss while giving your metabolism a boost that lasts for hours. To begin, try walking for two minutes, then running all out for 30 seconds; repeat that cycle for a total of 20 minutes, three to five times per week, and watch your body shed its fat layer. You can adjust the walking to running ratio as your fitness level improves, spending more time in sprint mode. Study
  1. Lift heavy objects: There is no doubt about it, resistance training is one of the fastest ways to whip your body into shape and shed unwanted pounds. Use good form, and push yourself beyond your comfort zone. You will be amazed at the transformative results. Study
  1. Manage stress and sleep: Sleep deprivation and stress make a double-edged sword that elevates cortisol levels, encouraging your body to hang onto fat. Your body needs sleep to maintain a healthy immune system and refresh your brain. Chronic stress leads to metabolic disease and weight gain. It is nearly impossible to lose weight when you are always stressed and sleep deprived. Study
  1. Fatten up your diet: A diet low in carbs and processed foods, with moderate amounts of protein and high in healthy fats encourages your body to use fat for fuel, all day long. Avocados, coconut oil, nuts, eggs, salmon, sardines, olives, cheese and other foods high in fat will cut your hunger pangs and give you plenty of energy for your workouts. Study

Losing excess body weight can be a positive step toward better health. However, the scale should not be your only tool for measuring your progress. A well designed fitness program will help you reduce your body fat percentage, lose inches, and increase your overall strength and endurance. Obsessing about the numbers on the scale can undermine your progress and kill your motivation. Instead of zeroing in on a specific body weight, think about your energy level and how well your clothes fit. Looking and feeling your best spells success!

Resources

W.I.T.S. has all the tools you need to keep pace with the fitness industry and stay informed about the latest research. Increase your value and tap into a growing market with an Older Adult Fitness Certification. Help your clients manage stress and lose weight with Lifestyle Fitness Coaching. Hone your business skills with our Online Business Management continuing education courses. Stay on top of the latest industry trends and watch your business grow with W.I.T.S.!

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Benefits of Exercise for Cancer Recovery

One of the most important, if not THE most important part of recovery from the debilitating side-effects of cancer surgery and treatment is correcting postural deviations that are the result of muscle imbalances. We must re-educate the body to restore its’ normal balance. Most of us think of balance as one’s ability to stand without falling, but it actually represents the ability to stabilize and maintain a specific body position. Postural control is defined as the act of maintaining, achieving, or restoring a state of balance during any posture or activity. Therefore, it only makes sense that performing exercises to correct range of motion and postural deviations, while incorporating the aspect of balance, would yield the greatest results! (more…)