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Medical Fitness Specialist Certification – Prepare for the Future

Author – Pamela G. Huenink, MS, EP-C

Are most of your clients healthy with no underlying conditions? Most likely no. In fact, the majority of your clients probably have at least one risk factor that puts them at a higher level for complications and restrictions with normal physical activity and exercise.

The increase in the incidence of disease has risen astronomically over the past 15-20 years. Many factors have played into this, such as a decrease in daily movement (usually because of the use of technology), increased portions sizes, bad health and wellness choices and even the lack of nutrition in our consumable whole foods. This has taken the previous fitness field as we know it and started to push it into a new direction: medical fitness.

A classic personal trainer certification teaches you the basics to assess, program and progress workouts for what we are told is the average client, but that healthy person is no longer the average client. So how do you prepare yourself as a personal trainer in this new developing area of medical fitness?

We all know that if we could take the effects of exercise on the human body and put it into a pill form, there would be no need for half of the jobs in the medical and fitness world.

The American College of Sports Medicine has long used the phrase Exercise is Medicine (EIM). Their EIM global health initiative “encourages physicians and other health care providers to include physical activity when designing treatment plans and to refer patients to evidence-based exercise programs and qualified exercise professionals. EIM is committed to the belief that physical activity promotes optimal health and is integral in the prevention and treatment of many medical conditions.”

World Instructor Training Schools (W.I.T.S.) has always been committed to providing the most up-to-date training for our personal trainers. Their new Advanced Medical Fitness course is bringing the medical fitness world to your doorstep and giving you the skills necessary to work with the new average client who may suffer from one of many underlying health conditions. This course will give you the knowledge to work with these clients and take referred patients from medical professionals looking to incorporate activity into their patient’s daily life. Your knowledge from this class can also protect you legally due to your ability to provide an increased safe workout environment.


Learn more about the Medical Fitness Specialist Certification


The following topics will be covered in depth in this course:

  • Exercise Is Medicine in Chronic Care
  • Basic Physical Activity and Exercise Recommendations for Persons With Chronic Conditions
  • Art of Clinical Exercise Programming
  • Art of Exercise Medicine: Counseling and Socioecological Factors
  • Approach to the Common Chronic Conditions
  • Chronic Conditions Strongly Associated With Physical Inactivity
  • Chronic Conditions Very Strongly Associated With Tobacco
  • Cancer, Significant Sequelae Related to Common Chronic Conditions
  • Depression and Anxiety Disorders

Prepare yourself for the future with this Medical Fitness Specialist Level I Certification that puts you a very large step above the rest of personal trainers! The MFS Level II Certification with more in-depth coverage of disease and chronic conditions will be available in the Fall of 2021.


Learn more about the Medical Fitness Specialist Certification


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Stackable Skills & You!

By Jay DelVecchio

What are stackable credentials?

The U.S. Department of Labor defines a stackable credential as being “part of a sequence of credentials that can be accumulated over time to build up an individual’s qualifications and help them to move along a career pathway or up a career ladder to different and potentially higher-paying jobs.” More plainly, stackable credentials can be viewed as building blocks where each short-term credential that a person earns builds into a higher-level credential.

Where do you stand in your fitness career?

Many of us joined the W.I.T.S. educational approach because they wanted to do it right when working with people in changing lifestyles. Now what? Do I need to do more or stay in my lane and just work super hard to get to full time and maybe even management or run my own business? The answer is to work smart. Climb the ladder of what is a very substantial sophisticated industry. We deal with people’s lives. Doing the bare minimum will not get it done for our goal or the special populations that we work with along the way. The cream does rise above and goes to the top. Be the cream even though it can be fattening, LOL.

If you are wondering why your treading water then start swimming and start swimming with a purpose. Get certified in senior fitness, youth fitness, injury rehabilitation, group fitness, wellness coaching and administration management. Drill down even further for specialty topics in pregnancy fitness, cardiovascular, arthritis, cancer and dietary considerations. These areas, especially the certification stackable skills, will open up new markets that will help you climb that ladder of sustainable success in a brick or virtual platform. W.I.T.S. has added an alumni membership to allow you an affordable career pathway to earn our ultimate ADVANCED HEALTH & WELLNESS Certificate. This certificate is the combination of all 5 certifications which is the only one of its kind in the fitness industry.

Here is the link to get started.

Additional Topical Resource

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The Use of Waivers of Liability by Health and Fitness Trainers/Facilities to Protect Against COVID-19 Infection Claims and Litigation

As of the date of writing this article, more than 3 million Americans have become infected with the novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”). Worldwide, that number has exceeded 12 million cases. Deaths from the virus have exceeded 137,000 in the United States (US), while deaths worldwide have climbed to over 550,000. These numbers are increasing.

Those who are most susceptible to contracting COVID-19 and/or dying from it include the elderly and/or obese and those suffering from auto-immune issues or heart disease, those that have preexisting lung conditions and/or other similar issues. While the virus has the capability of rapid community spread and contraction, the virus has a somewhat low mortality rate with more than 7 million people worldwide recovering from the virus to date (almost 1 million in the US). (more…)

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At Home Workout Success

Bodyweight Strength Training

By Abby Eastman MS Ed, Professional Fitness Trainer and Entrepreneur

A couple months into our newish normal during Corona Virus shutdowns I was missing the gym, my friends, the energy of teaching a classes and the encouragement of my gym family. I knew I needed to get into a better routine and figure out a way to navigate the roads ahead. In our area of the country we still have shutdowns and not everything is open. And although it has been tough not having my normal space, toys and connectivity with clients, adjusting to a new normal has had a lot of perks! I have more time to exercise on my own and experiment with new full body workouts and pop into my favorite group classes I can’t normally attend via zoom. I have even brushed up on my video training skills while gaining new clients virtually.

Even though heading to your favorite gym for a daily workout or train might not be a possibility right now, here are a few tips for setting up a home workout space.

First: When at all possible stick to your regular full body workout time and help your clients do the same. Are you a morning exerciser? Great – schedule yourself in at the time you would usually hit the gym! Work with clients to help them keep their regularly scheduled time even if it has to be a remote session. Having a sense of routine in this uncertain time can help us mentally and physically stay in shape.

Second: Trainers, explore what new options you can offer clients virtually. Reach out to current and past clients to share your new services. You can provide custom, home-based programs on the equipment they have available. Try scheduling a free 15-minute virtual session to give them a jumpstart. Boot camp, small groups, private sessions, outdoor sessions and pop up workouts are just a few options you can offer if you haven’t started already. Share with clients the benefits of booking additional check-in sessions the keep their momentum. It will keep them accountable and connected while building your business.

Additionally, this is a wonderful opportunity for us as personal trainers to break out a new fitness plan and get out of our own training rut. You could try a new workout routine app, hop in a fellow trainer’s virtual class, or breakout those old workout DVD’s. Have you been meaning to try kickboxing, martial arts, or yoga? Been eyeing a new certification or continuing education course? Now is a great time to experiment with activities you may not normally get the chance to from the comfort of your own home. Bonus: now you can have your AC adjusted just how you like it! Clients will enjoy the spice you bring to their sessions.

Third: Create your space! You do not need a lot of space but having dedicated area can help you stick to your routine. Great fitness at home workout equipment options include:

  • Free weights
  • Kettle bells
  • Resistance bands
  • TRX
  • Bosu
  • Stability Ball
  • Step

These items do not take up a lot of space and can make for a great total body routine whether building muscle, bodyweight exercises or anything with fitness at home.

If you have extra space, search through your local online yard sales and gym equipment sales. Many sell refurbished gym equipment for great prices. Grab your favorite cardio machine and pair it with a bench, corner cable unit and you will have a whole new area to look forward to. Challenge yourself to stick with your workouts and reward yourself with new toys.

Trainers create your virtual space for optimal training by:

  • Taping off a pre-determined space for filming. Place an “X” where your computer or camera stand goes and a square of tape around the perimeter that is within the viewing area you need to stay within while filming. Makes it easy to jump into a session quickly and ensures clients can see you!
  • Try an adjustable camera stand. You can easily adjust the viewing area so the client can see your form while standing, seated or reclined.
  • Be sure the lighting is pointing toward you. Lights shining in from the side or behind you make you look like a dark shadow. It also makes it hard for clients to see you.
  • Set the stage you created with all equipment clients will need so it is visible to them when they sign on.
  • Create a clean background behind you that is simple.
  • Wear bright colors! You will show up best on camera in bright, solid colors.
  • If you are filming at your facility, show off a familiar space to help clients feel at home.
  • Welcome clients just like you would at your facility and invite all types of strength training, body weight, cardio, HIIT exercise requests if possible.

While this may not be the way we are accustomed to working with clients there are plenty of ways we can continue to reach people virtually. Many clients are finding virtual workouts with a personal trainer easier to attend. Clients can stay in the comfort of their home or office, kids can be in the background and they can skip traffic!

Share with us what ways you are reaching clients; we’d love to hear what new tricks you’ve learned!

Check out our new workshops @ https://www.witseducation.com/fit/store-category/pre-sale/ with all new full body workouts that are on pre-sale in August. Use this link to get all 3 for this special price of $195.00 https://www.witseducation.com/fit/store-category/pre-sale/ and check out the PRE-SALE special or use the PROMO CODE minus20cert to get any individual course for 20% off individually.

Want to talk some more? Join our BLOGCAST August 11 @ 1pm EST. Send a request to register to jdelvec@witseducation.com

Presenters Bio

Abby Eastman, Ms Ed, ACSM C-EP, ERYT-200, CHWC

Abby holds a BS and Ms Ed in Exercises Science. She has over 20 years of experience teaching health education, group exercise, yoga, and personal training. She has taught at the university and community college levels and directed a variety of community fitness programs. She has been working with W.I.T.S. in various rolls including mentoring online programs, continuing education creation, leading webinars, and teaching in-person certifications since 2004. She believes everyone deserves to feel and live their best life and is passionate partnering with others to help them get there.

Abby Eastman MSEd, ACSM Exercise Physiologist/EIM II, CHWC, E-RYT200

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Exercise Immunology 101: Considerations for the Fitness Professional

Outdoor Exercise

by Joseph Giandonato, MBA, MS, CSCS

As the COVID-19 pandemic transforms our society and a myriad of industries, including our own, concerns about safely continuing to pursue fitness goals have emerged as fitness instructors and the clients they support weigh the risks versus rewards during these unprecedented times.

Nationwide, cases have continued to surge in spite of attempts to temper the proliferation of the virus as government organizations at the federal, state, and local levels work to strike a delicate balance between curating the health of citizens and restoring the economy. Measures such as abridging capacity and hours of operation of multiple fitness and recreational facilities, including temporarily shuttering venues and suspending services, while disruptive, are intended to keep us healthy.

Long term held beliefs about exercise adversely impacting immune system is the functioning has been corroborated by a landmark review authored by Gleeson (2007). The review demonstrated that the inflammatory response of a singular bout of intense and prolonged exercise mirrors that of infection, sepsis, or trauma, triggering the release of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor, and interleukins 6 and 10, C-recreative protein, and interleukin-1-receptor antagonists that, in concert, influence the augmentation of circulating white blood cells, known as leukocytes.

Hormonal secretion following an intense bout of exercise induced activity, specifically epinephrine and cortisol blunt the secretion of leukocytes and impair cell mediated immunity and inflammation, thereby increasing the susceptibility of infection and modulating the morbidity and severity of illness. Previous research established a strong correlation between a exercise dose and upper respiratory tract infection among humans. Health fitness exercise bouts consisting of a stimuli that is too novel, too frequent, too intense, and too voluminous to which the subject is accustomed have been found to increase pathogen infection risk. There has been a considerable amount of studies that have demonstrated the temporary ergolytic effects of acute exercise on immune system functioning, ranging from three to 72 hours post-exercise. Researchers and health and exercise professionals have coined this period of time characterized by temporary suppression of the immune system as “the open window”.

To simultaneously curtail infection risk and facilitate the achievement of improved fitness industry qualities or biomotor skills, one must account for life stress, energy availability, sleep duration and quality, travel, and exposure to environmental or climate extremes beyond the exercise frequency, intensity, volume, and type, according to Professor Neil Walsh, a faculty member at Bangor University in the United Kingdom, who outlined recommendations for athletes to maintain immune health.

Key guidelines among the few dozen presented are summarized below for personal trainers in working with potential clients:

  1. Undulating training stress throughout training cycles and weeks
  2. Incorporating active recovery sessions
  3. Incrementally increasing volume and intensity, but no more than 5-10% per week
  4. Minimize unnecessary life stress
  5. Monitor, manage, and quantify all forms of stress, both psychological and physical
  6. Aim for more than seven hours of sleep each night; nap during the daytime, if able to, or necessary
  7. Monitor sleep duration and quality; ensure darkness at bedtime
  8. Be cognizant of reduced exercise capacity in hotter, more humid environments
  9. Permit acclimatization to changes in, or extreme weather
  10. Uphold optimal or recommended nutrition, hydration, and hygiene practices
  11. Do not engage in extreme dieting; be sure to consume a well balanced diet
  12. Discontinue training if experiencing symptoms “below the neck” as they could be indicative of an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI)
  13. Avoid sick and/or symptomatic people
  14. Practice good hand hygeine

Exercise evokes a hormetic effect, or dose-dependent response, meaning that moderate exposure can be beneficial, but amounts either too minimal or excessive can cause harm. This is precisely why exercise physiology scholars and health and medical professionals alike have embraced the mantra of “exercise is medicine” in recent years. Too little exercise results in greater cardiometabolic disease (aka conditions of “disuse”) risk, whereas too much exercise results in greater injury or illness (aka conditions of “overuse”). As mentioned in an earlier post, “acute singular bouts of exercise at or above lactate threshold (55% of VO2max among untrained individuals; 85% of VO2max among trained individuals) for periods of up to, or more than one hour, contributed to temporary immunosuppression. Regular exercise among individuals has shown to yield immunoprotective benefits. The takeaway here should be, exercise during this time should be regarded as a tool to reinvigorate and recover, not bury and deliberately fatigue. Sparingly perform sets to failure and limit volume at or beyond lactate threshold.”

In summary, immune system performance and overall health can be achieved through regular exercise. During times of greater illness transmission and infection risk, fitness professionals, athletes, and enthusiasts must practice both diligence and vigilance to ward off foreign pathogens. Fitness goals should be targeted and inputs, such as time and effort should be quantified to calculate training load. Rest and recovery should be as equally, if not greater prioritized.

References

  • Gleeson, M. (2007). Immune function in sport and exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 103 (2), 693-699.
  • Kakanis, M.W., Peake, J., Brenu, E.W., Simmonds, M., Gray, B., Hooper, S.L., & Marshall-Gradisnik, S.M. (2010). Exercise Immunology Review, 16, 119-137.
  • Murphy, E.A., Davis, J.M., Carmichael, M.D., Gangemi, J.D., Ghaffar, A., & Mayer, E.P. (2008). Exercise stress increases susceptibility to influenza infection. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 22, (8), 1152-1155.
  • Nieman, D.C. (1994). Exercise, infection, and immunity. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 15, S131-S141
  • Walsh, N.P. (2018). Recommendations to maintain immune health in athletes. European Journal of Sport Science, 18 (6), 820-831.
  • Wong, C., Lai, H., Ou, C., Ho, S., Chan, K., Thach, T., Yang, L., Chau, Y., Lam, T., Hedley, A.J., & Peiris, J.S.M. (2008). Is exercise protective against influenza-associated mortality? PLoS One, 3 (5): e2108.

 

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Suggestions on How to Safely Re-open your Fitness Facility

By: Mark S. Cassidy, MS

Let’s face it, the COVID-19 pandemic (in relation to a baseball analogy) has been a curveball that no one has been able to hit cleanly. That being said, we all still need to stand in the batter box and take our best swing.

As states across the country begin to allow fitness centers, health clubs, wellness centers and athletic facilities to open, there are still numerous precautions that have to be considered with coronavirus. For all of us who are actively involved with the Fitness Industry, we can’t simply think that it is going to be business as usual. Its not. All of us (members, clients, personal trainers) are going to have to be much more conscious and take a proactive approach to try and ensure the safety of everyone. This won’t necessarily be easy, but it is doable.

The following is a usable list of suggestions that should be considered when you prepare to reopen to start fitness sessions and training activities for your client base:

Fitness Facility Usage

  • Remove equipment (strength and cardio) from some areas and have it located in another part of your facility to help with physical distancing
  • Make some equipment (strength and cardio) unusable (maybe by posting sign on it), then changing which equipment is usable daily
  • Utilize multiple doors in the facility – One for “Entrance” – One for “Exit”
  • Temporarily remove all fitness accessories and portable recreational equipment (bands, balls, bars, etc.) from the fitness area
  • Supply additional cleaning supplies, then require all participants to clean up / wipe down fitness equipment after use
  • Require wearing a mask or cloth face shields be worn by everyone in the facility
  • Perform temperature checks for everyone entering the facility
  • Air flow is key so use your fans in the building and leave your fan setting for the A/C on.
  • Require all members or clients to sign a Liability Waver specific to COVID-19
  • Additional Hand Sanitizer units should be installed in facility
  • Limit that only 2 people may be in any rest room, at any time
  • Limit that only 2 people may use the elevator, at any time (if you have one)
  • Consider establishing a “fitness room capacity’, then require any interested participant to schedule an appointment time, in order to use the room / equipment
  • Consider to temporarily not allow access to the locker rooms / showers
  • Consider foot-plates or arm-bars to open the doors in the facility
  • Consider offering any live fitness-group classes virtually
  • Temporary suspend any recreational activities, games, and competitions on a basketball court, racquetball court, or turf field where intentional or inadvertent physical contact may occur
  • Eliminate the use of any room or area that cannot be monitored by a staff member
  • Rearrange Fitness Staff or Sales Staff offices, to help with social distancing and allow for immediate cleaning when their use is completed
  • Consider adjusting the operating scheduling of the facility (longer of shorter) to accommodate community members who have preexisting health conditions, along with controlling the flow of foot traffic in the facility
  • Staggered scheduling for Fitness Staff, so not all the staff members are in the facility at the same time
  • Allow Staff Member to work from home, on task and work assignments that do not require them to be in the facility
  • Scheduled workout sessions for specific participants, with a limit on the number of participants on the court, field or gym at a time
  • Once a group session is concluded, those participants will be required to leave the facility or field, so the next group can participate
  • Don’t allow friends or family members to wait in the facility during a session
  • Clients are to bring their own fitness or athletic equipment (balls, bands, clothes, etc.), to all fitness training sessions. The Staff will not be allowed give out equipment
  • Clients or members must bring their own water or snacks with them to all training sessions

 

Fitness Facility Rentals

  • Any group that wishes to rent or reserve any field or court in the facility must do so through a designated staff representative of the facility, do so 24 hours in advance, and supply a list of all participants who will be using the field or court
  • Inactive participants, reserves, or members serving in the capacity of a “coach”, “photographer”, or “referee” must maintain a distance of six feet or more from other persons at all times
  • Aforementioned persons must always wear a facial covering, mask, or shield while not participating
  • A designated staff member will determine what sports or activities will be permitted on any field or court in the facility, along with having direct and final input on any rules that are associated with predetermined sports or activities
  • Recreational and sporting activities with greater rates of contact, whether intentional or incidental, are prohibited
  • Participants are to follow self-screening measures prior to entering premises which include temperature and symptom checks. Those who have a body temperature of 100.4F or symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 are prohibited from entering the premises
  • Those who exhibit symptoms during play or while on premises, must vacate immediately and seek appropriate medical attention
  • Beverages with open containers and food and snacks, specifically gum, lozenges, and sunflower seeds are prohibited due to increased risk of transmission via saliva.
  • The sharing of beverages, including water and sports drinks, from the same container, is highly discouraged
  • Participants are strongly discouraged from high fiving, handshaking, fist bumping, hugging and sharing other forms of physical contact with one another. Additionally, participants are discouraged from touching their faces with their hands and fingers
  • Personal property is to be stored along the perimeter of the field or court, and more than six feet away from possessions belonging to other persons

 

I recognize that there are a lot of potential rules or restrictions on the list, along with other ones that could be included. However, because we all work at various locations, with different populations, with different requirements, my suggestion would be to apply as many of these as possible to your specific athletic, fitness, and wellness training situation.

Together, we can all make a positive impact on limiting the exposure of COVID-19. Then we can all get back to what it is we like to do – physically training and conditioning our clients, members and athletes… … and swinging for the fences …

Stay Safe.

Mark Cassidy explains how to safely re-open your fitness facilityMark S. Cassidy, MS has been actively involved with the Fitness and Athletic Industry for over 25 years.

He has held professional positions with The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, World Instructors Training Schools, Philadelphia 76ers, YMCA, Delaware Blue Coats, Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association, and American Heart Association. Mark has an Associate’s degree in Business from Delaware County Community College, a Bachelor’s degree in Exercise Physiology from Temple University, a Master’s degree in Organizational Development/Business Psychology from The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, and certification through the National Strength and Conditioning Association. He has professional experience as a Fitness Instructor, Strength Coach, Sports Coach-Counselor, Exercise Therapist, Sales Manager, College Professor, and Athletic Facility Director

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Finding Your Customers: Listen, Define, and Think to Increase Your Social Media Presence

It’s hard to imagine what life would be like without the various forms of social media that influence our lives each day. Do you have a social media presence? Is it for your personal use or strictly for your professional use? If you do, you’re part of an ever-growing population that is adopting the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other platforms. Over the past ten years, the use of social media has exploded. According to Forbes, there are now 5.2 billion individuals with cell phones on this planet and there are 3.8 billion social media users. That means that, in all likelihood, 2020 will be the final year where less than half of the Earth’s population will be using some form of social media. That’s a pretty shocking statistic!

Looking back at the first paragraph of this post, if you answered “yes” to the question posed, you’re already on your way! What matters most to you is whether or not you’re truly maximizing your presence by understanding the role of social media in the promotion of your brand or business.

If you answered “no” to the question posed in the opening paragraph, what is it that is holding your back from tapping into this massive pool of potential revenue? Most people who avoid social media cite a lack of tech savvy or fear of “misuse” as their primary reasons for not getting their brand or business online. Consider, though, the potential revenue you may be missing out on.

A large part of proper social media use is increasing your visibility. The more visible you become, the more likely you are to monetize your online presence. Did you know that, in 2020, companies are expected to spend nearly $43 billion on social media advertising and, by 2022, companies will invest $15 billion on influencer marketing? Influencers, by definition, are people who have built a reputation for their knowledge and expertise on a specific topic. These people, through their posts, have gathered such a following that brands and companies are willing to actually pay them for their exposure!

Social media newbies and veterans alike can benefit from the introductory concepts taught in this mini-course. For example, one of the most important things about using interactive social media is “likeability”. Do people who view your content find it to be worthwhile? Do they like viewing your content enough to follow you or give your post the cherished “like”? Whether you’re using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, or one of the many other platforms available, Finding Your Customers: Listen, Define, and Think to Increase Your Social Media Presence will give you the necessary tools to help you increase your social media presence and, more importantly, become more “likeable” online. You will learn how to listen online, how to target markets using different social media outlets, and develop more authentic online relationships that will increase business and sales.

Click here to visit the W.I.T.S. store and explore our Online Business Management Success Series course offerings!

[1] Koetsier, John. “Why 2020 Is A Critical Global Tipping Point For Social Media.” Forbes, Forbes Magazine, 19 Feb. 2020, www.forbes.com/sites/johnkoetsier/2020/02/18/why-2020-is-a-critical-global-tipping-point-for-social-media/#120e135b2fa5.

[2] Cooper, P. (2020, April 23). 43 Social Media Advertising Stats that Matter to Marketers in 2020. Retrieved from https://blog.hootsuite.com/social-media-advertising-stats/

[3] Schomer, A. (2019, December 17). Influencer Marketing: State of the social media influencer market in 2020. Retrieved from https://www.businessinsider.com/influencer-marketing-report

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Insurance & Coverage In The Age Of COVID-19

CPH & Associates is committed to supporting our clients during the Covid-19 pandemic. We understand that many of you have had to alter the way you practice in order to face this unprecedented challenge.

As you shift to providing training sessions via online platforms, we are pleased to assure you that your professional liability policy covers online/video services, per the terms and conditions of the policy.There is no additional “rider” or endorsement that you need to add to your policy to be covered for these services. We encourage you to confirm that you are providing services legally within the scope of your state’s laws.

It is important to ensure you are protected while you continue to see clients during this time. Injury and mishaps can still occur, especially with the limitations of online/video training and the lack of hands-on instruction. A policy with CPH provides peace of mind while you and your clients adapt to unfamiliar methods of working together.

Questions about your policy? Please call us at 800-875-1911 or send us an email at info@cphins.com.

Interested in learning more about our coverage for W.I.T.S. members? Please click here for our Coverage Highlights.

Please let us know if you need anything else!

Sarah HolionaCPH & Associates insurance COVID-19

Phone: 800-875-1911
Website: www.cphins.com
Address: 711 S. Dearborn St, Ste. 205 | Chicago, IL 60605

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Mastering Your Financial Future as a Fitness Professional

You set a goal to be a Certified Personal Trainer. You wanted to attend the best fitness school on the market to make a difference in lives. You worked hard memorizing the human anatomy, programming for cardio and resistance training and injury prevention, to name a few categories. You spent hours interning how to interact with clients, professional etiquette and program progression. Now it’s time to get out there and get your future started!

You’ve landed a personal training job with the company you have admired for years. You are dressed in the fancy attire, you have all of your new client paperwork organized and a smile on your face. You are ready to train but, now what?

You need to find clients! Where do you find them? How do you approach them? Once you get their attention, how do you convince them they need to hire you?

If you find yourself asking these questions, you are not alone. There are various ways to approach the final result of obtaining a new client. Mastering Your Financial Future as a Fitness Professional is an excellent course that will help you learn these skills and start your journey as a certified personal trainer on the right foot.

Here are some quick insightful sources.

As a sample of what is included in this 2 CEC course, let’s take a look at a list of common mistakes that trainers make which can often lead to retention issues!

  1. Giving cookie cutter workouts: Don’t make the mistake of thinking your clients don’t know when you’re slacking. They can go online if they want a workout available to the public. Know your client and design their journey!
  2. Not obtaining a medical history: During the assessment, you will find out a little about their medical history but not all of it. Know who you are working with so you can provide the most appropriate modifications.
  3. Poor record keeping: This is one important way to keep your client motivated and hold them accountable. They may physically see and feel changes in their body and mind but showing them their accomplishments on paper can be eye opening. The other side to this is your backup if they are not achieving results. This is proof that you are doing everything on your end. The accountability falls on them to do what they need to do when you are not around.
  4. Pushing a client too far too fast: Again, now your clients. Some may look like they can perform difficult movements from the start, but for one reason or another are unable to. You need to know what they are capable of and introduce movements at the appropriate times.
  5. Poor communication: This goes without saying. Most problems in life are due to a lack of communication. Results happen when you and your client can focus 100% on the goal at hand.
  6. Not giving 100% attention to your client: When you are with a client, you should be with them and them only! Not chatting with other members, clients or co-workers, not on your phone and certainly not focusing on your own workouts! They are paying for your time and deserve every second of it.
  7. Going beyond your scope of practice: Stick to what you know. You wouldn’t want someone giving you the wrong information, so don’t do it to your clients. If you don’t know the solution, inform them you will figure it out. You can also refer your client to a more appropriate contact. Keep a list of what you don’t know and make it a point to learn something new every day.
  8. Specializing too early: Give yourself some time to find your niche. Don’t choose an area to focus on just because it’s popular this month. Make it a point to be familiar with new trends, but don’t become the expert on all of them. You will find your niche naturally.

Overall, knowing your strengths and weaknesses, staying inside your scope of practice and listening to what the client wants are some important keys to success. It’s your job as a trainer to figure out what the client needs, and this will come with time. The road to becoming a successful personal trainer can be a long one and it’s essential to have the best tools and tips to help you along the way. Mastering Your Financial Future as a Fitness Professional is the perfect course to get that journey started.

Register during the month of March and, as a special offer just for you, receive 20% off of your CEC courses!

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You Finally Got Your Personal Trainer Certification: Now What?

Getting your personal trainer certification is a big step toward a bright future as a fitness professional. Studying for and passing your exam and getting CPR certified demand a lot of time and effort, but certification is just the beginning. To make the most of your personal trainer certification and turn it into a sustainable career, you need to take some additional steps toward professionalism.

Lifestyle Fitness Coaching Certification Professional holding a clipboard

5 Steps Toward Becoming a Successful Certified Fitness Professional

The following five steps will get you started on the right path toward a successful career as a Certified Personal Trainer:

  1. Get hands-on experience: Some newly certified trainers already have a background in fitness. Some have academic degrees in exercise science and related fields, and others have backgrounds in athletics or bodybuilding. Whether you have a background in fitness or not, working with clients requires additional skills. Consider enrolling in the W.I.T.S. internship program. As an intern, you gain experience working one-on-one with clients, and you get a glimpse of the fitness business from the other side of the front desk.
  1. Purchase Liability Insurance: Physical activities of any type come with inherent risks for injury. While the benefits of fitness activities outweigh the risks, there is always the chance that something can go wrong. Even if you work in a gym or studio that provides coverage for its employees, it is wise to protect yourself with additional insurance. The good news is that liability insurance for personal trainers is remarkably inexpensive. After all, an important part of your job is to protect your clients from injury, so the risk is relatively low. Follow this link to find affordable liability insurance.
  1. Form an LLC: A legal liability corporation (LLC) is a legal entity that protects business owners and their families from lawsuits, creditors and other business liabilities that may arise. Unlike a sole proprietorship, with an LLC, only the assets of your business are at risk — your personal assets and those of your family are protected, should your business fail or fall on hard times. An LLC is easy to form and inexpensive to register. There are many online resources to help you form an LLC.
  1. Define your niche: There is nothing wrong with taking on a broad range of clients, but narrowing your niche can help you establish a solid reputation as a fitness expert. Certain clients may be outside your scope of expertise, while focusing on a specific population can enable you to grow professionally while having a positive impact on the lives of your clients. Youth, older adults, pregnant and postpartum women, body builders and figure competitors — the list goes on and on. Choose your niche and grow a robust clientele to promote your business.
  1. Establish your brand: Once you establish yourself as a certified fitness professional,expand your client base and cement your expertise by branding yourself online. Professional posts on social media, a professional website and Facebook page and maybe even a YouTube channel are great ways to reach an ever-growing audience and expand your business. Use your imagination to create a solid brand image that reaches the masses.

Find Your Niche and Build Your Fitness Career

Build your skills and knowledge and become a top personal trainer. Choose from any of our professional fitness courses for skills training and certification:

Join the W.I.T.S. family of industry leaders today, and build your career as a fitness professional on a solid foundation.