W.I.T.S. – Certified Personal Training

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USANational Fitness PanelCourse/Career Information10/03/20REGISTER

Personal Training Certifications

Successful Certified Personal Trainers need more than book knowledge. Therefore, it is crucial to know the effects of exercise and how the body will react to it. In addition you need the practical mastery of the skills in assessing a client and how to take competent steps to physically and mentally get your client to the promise land of measurable lifestyle results. Learn More

NCCA Accredited Program - Seal of Accreditation

Welcome to W.I.T.S. (World Instructor Training Schools)

The World Instructor Training Schools (W.I.T.S.) has been leading for 25 years to enhance public safety by developing and administering true health and fitness certification programs.  Furthermore, jobs in this industry are projected to grow 16% into 2021.  As a result, W.I.T.S. can certify you in personal training, group fitness, older adult and other disciplines in this industry.

The W.I.T.S. Certified Personal Trainer is the only organization to receive NCCA accreditation in the practical skills and the theoretical knowledge.  In addition, W.I.T.S. courses are at hundreds of neighborhood colleges and universities with college credits through the American Council on Education (www.acenet.edu).  Check out how we prepare our graduates for a solid career.

fitness trainer certification

What W.I.T.S. Students and Graduates Are Saying

“I believe that the Internship requirement by WITS is invaluable! It forced me into a real training environment with real clients. I worked with 5 different trainers and was exposed to different training styles as well as very varied client ability levels. I saw first-hand how to interact successfully with clients and to keep them moving through their exercises. The Internship gave me the confidence I needed when I first began working as a Personal Trainer – I was hired at the facility I interned at!!! Get Moving!” — Carole K.     View More Testimonials & References

Introduction to Dumbbell Training

Believe it or not, dumbbell training has been around since ancient Greece. They used stone or metal that was carved to include a handle and weighed between 4 and 20 lbs. They were called halteres. The term dumbbell, however, is believed to have originated in England (Hedrick, 2020). Various types of dumbbells can be used with a single or a pair of dumbbells in a bent over row, bench press and more.

These include adjustable, fixed, and selectorized. no matter what style you use, dumbbells have many benefits, and these include:

Practical Advantages

  1. Low Cost
  2. Adaptability
  3. Can be used anywhere
  4. Suited for explosive training
  5. Little training space is required
  6. Can train all muscle groups
  7. Only need a relatively small number of dumbbells
  8. Safer than barbells on specific exercises
  9. Easier for individuals with injuries
  10. Easier to learn than barbell exercises

Physiological Advantages

  1. A more complex motor activity
  2. Opportunity to perform alternating movements
  3. Opportunity to perform single-arm movements
  4. Adds a balance requirement which works core muscles
  5. Stabilizing muscles are more active
  6. Reduces the potential for injury by enhancing joint stability
  7. Increases potential range of motion
  8. Adds variation to the training program (Hedrick, 2020)

Now that you know why using dumbbells is essential in a workout, let us look at how to incorporate them into your program. You can either incorporate dumbbells into an existing program or design a whole new program for your client. Either way, there are some necessary steps you will want to take.

  1. Decide on your philosophy of training.
  2. Establish your client’s goals.
  3. Use scientifically sound information and concrete guidelines (Hint: You can find these in a W.I.T.S. course).
  4. Use the concept of periodization: The practice of dividing training into specific cycles with each cycle targeting a specific physiological adaption.
  5. Incorporate training variables.
  6. Teach proper technique. Technique should always take precedence over intensity.

There are a plethora of dumbbell exercises out there. These dumbbell exercises can work all the major muscles for the full body effect.  Those exercises can work the tricep muscles, upper arms, and develop full range of motion.

Almost any exercise your client is doing on a machine can be done with a set of dumbbells. Add in simple variations on each exercise, and you have just quadrupled the movements you can do. You can work on muscle isolating movements like bicep curls or compound movements that work multiple muscles at one time, like squats. You can even put the two together and have your client do a squat-bicep curl move.

“This is the interesting part of designing training programs because it is part science and part art—art in the sense that you can use your creativity to design what you believe is the best approach to improving athletic performance. Although the art aspect provides room for creativity, the vast majority of a training program should be based on science” (Hedrick, 2020)

So take a look at the programs you are designing and ask yourself where can I add in some dumbbell training? Want to know more about programming, various exercises for upper body, weight loss aspects and more? Sign up now for the Introduction to Dumbbell Training in the W.I.T.S. Store

Check out this great Infographic about guidelines of resistance training

Stop by the W.I.T.S. store to check out the Introduction to Dumbbell Training course and our other C.E.C. offerings. Check back in often as we are beginning to develop a new line of courses specific to trainers’ current needs.

References

Hedrick, Allen, (2020).  Dumbbell training. (2nd ed.). Human Kinetics.

Presenters Bio

Martha Swirzinski, Ed.D.Martha Swirzinski

Martha holds an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction and a master’s degree in Kinesiology. She has over 25 years of experience in teaching exercise science, health education, and personal training. She teaches in higher education and develops courses worldwide for various organizations. She has been with W.I.T.S. in multiple roles, including mentoring online programs, course development, webinars, and teaching since 2009.

Keeping Kids Active When Schools Are Closed

By Dave Johnson, MEd

The COVID-19 pandemic has been, and continues to be, a struggle on virtually everyone across the globe. Economies are tanking, people are losing jobs, and prolonged isolation is driving record cases of depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders. Most attention during the pandemic has been on adults; after all, they are (generally speaking) more at risk of complications from this virus than children and, for the most part, have been the ones driving infections.

The start of the public school academic year, however, is right around the corner and many school districts are struggling with the learning environment and the decision whether or not to physically welcome students back in their buildings. While evidence suggests that children are less likely to have severe complications, we have seen the number of children contracting COVID-19 dramatically increase since schools and camps started re-opening. A recent report from the American Academy of Pediatrics reports that, in the last few weeks of July, 97,000 new cases of COVID-19 in children. As more states begin to re-open their schools, it’s anticipated that the number of cases will skyrocket. Online education is an option but this article is about being at home.

Why does this matter to personal trainers? Odds are, if numbers continue to climb, schools will close again. If schools close again, that means that most interscholastic athletic teams will also stop playing and practicing and children will not be physically active during physical education class. Simply put, this means that most children will not have any guided physical activity in their lives. This is a major public health concern! As a baseline, during normal times, fewer than 25% of children meet the recommended physical activity guidelines for their age. Even those children who are involved in sports fall victim to this. Have you ever thought about how much time is spent during practice simply standing around?

If you’ve read my previous blog post (The Hidden Benefits of Physical Activity in Youth), you’re already familiar with some of the lesser known benefits of physical activity in children. From a COVID-centric perspective, though, there are three major benefits to focus on:

Regular exercise boosts the immune system – Research has consistently shown that regular, moderate-intensity exercise has immune-boosting benefits that may help children and adults to fight off infections, including COVID-19.

Regular exercise may prevent weight gain – Energy balance and how it applies to body composition is well-known among personal trainers, but consider that kids are eating more fast-food than ever. That, coupled with childhood obesity rates being what they are, means this is a target demographic that desperately needs our help!

Regular exercise will reduce stress and anxiety – We know adults are stressed but kids are, too! One of the most important components of in-person schooling is the enhanced social dynamic it provides or a work online learning balance. Simply being around their peers is incredibly beneficial for most children and, since March, many have been isolated and have not had the opportunity to engage in regular age-appropriate conversation with friends.

This all may seem bleak but there is good news: we can help! There are strategies that personal trainers can utilize to help families stay active together and promote a healthy lifestyle for both their children and themselves. Join me in our upcoming BlogCast to learn more about these strategies and how you can help this unique demographic survive and thrive during this pandemic.

Please register for Keeping Kids Active When Schools are Closed on Aug 19, 2020 3:00 PM EDT.

Want more specific ideas to excel with our youth and your children?  Check out our Youth Fitness Foundations programs and others for direction to expand this market as a Personal Trainer and as a parent.  Check these out!

Youth Fitness Foundations

and

Youth Fitness Practical Review

 

At Home Workout Success

By Abby Eastman MS Ed, Professional Fitness Trainer and Entrepreneur

A couple months into our newish normal during Corona Virus shutdowns I was missing the gym, my friends, the energy of teaching a classes and the encouragement of my gym family. I knew I needed to get into a better routine and figure out a way to navigate the roads ahead.  In our area of the country we still have shutdowns and not everything is open. And although it has been tough not having my normal space, toys and connectivity with clients, adjusting to a new normal has had a lot of perks! I have more time to exercise on my own and experiment with new full body workouts and pop into my favorite group classes I can’t normally attend via zoom.  I have even brushed up on my video training skills while gaining new clients virtually.

Even though heading to your favorite gym for a daily workout or train might not be a possibility right now, here are a few tips for setting up a home workout space.

First: When at all possible stick to your regular full body workout time and help your clients do the same. Are you a morning exerciser? Great – schedule yourself in at the time you would usually hit the gym! Work with clients to help them keep their regularly scheduled time even if it has to be a remote session. Having a sense of routine in this uncertain time can help us mentally and physically stay in shape.

Second: Trainers, explore what new options you can offer clients virtually. Reach out to current and past clients to share your new services.  You can provide custom, home-based programs on the equipment they have available. Try scheduling a free 15-minute virtual session to give them a jumpstart. Boot camp, small groups, private sessions, outdoor sessions and pop up workouts are just a few options you can offer if you haven’t started already. Share with clients the benefits of booking additional check-in sessions the keep their momentum.  It will keep them accountable and connected while building your business.

Additionally, this is a wonderful opportunity for us as personal trainers to break out a new fitness plan and get out of our own training rut.  You could try a new workout routine app, hop in a fellow trainer’s virtual class, or breakout those old workout DVD’s. Have you been meaning to try kickboxing, martial arts, or yoga? Been eyeing a new certification or continuing education course? Now is a great time to experiment with activities you may not normally get the chance to from the comfort of your own home. Bonus: now you can have your AC adjusted just how you like it! Clients will enjoy the spice you bring to their sessions.

Third: Create your space!  You do not need a lot of space but having dedicated area can help you stick to your routine. Great fitness at home workout equipment options include:

  • Free weights
  • Kettle bells
  • Resistance bands
  • TRX
  • Bosu
  • Stability Ball
  • Step

These items do not take up a lot of space and can make for a great total body routine whether building muscle, bodyweight exercises or anything with fitness at home.

If you have extra space, search through your local online yard sales and gym equipment sales. Many sell refurbished gym equipment for great prices. Grab your favorite cardio machine and pair it with a bench, corner cable unit and you will have a whole new area to look forward to.  Challenge yourself to stick with your workouts and reward yourself with new toys.

Trainers create your virtual space for optimal training by:

  • Taping off a pre-determined space for filming. Place an “X” where your computer or camera stand goes and a square of tape around the perimeter that is within the viewing area you need to stay within while filming.  Makes it easy to jump into a session quickly and ensures clients can see you!
  • Try an adjustable camera stand. You can easily adjust the viewing area so the client can see your form while standing, seated or reclined.
  • Be sure the lighting is pointing toward you.  Lights shining in from the side or behind you make you look like a dark shadow. It also makes it hard for clients to see you.
  • Set the stage you created with all equipment clients will need so it is visible to them when they sign on.
  • Create a clean background behind you that is simple.
  • Wear bright colors!  You will show up best on camera in bright, solid colors.
  • If you are filming at your facility, show off a familiar space to help clients feel at home.
  • Welcome clients just like you would at your facility and invite all types of strength training, body weight, cardio, HIIT exercise requests if possible.

While this may not be the way we are accustomed to working with clients there are plenty of ways we can continue to reach people virtually.  Many clients are finding virtual workouts with a personal trainer easier to attend. Clients can stay in the comfort of their home or office, kids can be in the background and they can skip traffic!

Share with us what ways you are reaching clients; we’d love to hear what new tricks you’ve learned!

Check out our new workshops @ https://www.witseducation.com/fit/store-category/pre-sale/ with all new full body workouts that are on pre-sale in August.  Use this link to get all 3 for this special price of $195.00  https://www.witseducation.com/fit/store-category/pre-sale/  and check out the PRE-SALE special or use the PROMO CODE minus20cert to get any individual course for 20% off individually.

Want to talk some more?  Join our BLOGCAST August 11 @ 1pm EST.  Send a request to register to jdelvec@witseducation.com

 

Presenters Bio

Abby Eastman, Ms Ed, ACSM C-EP, ERYT-200, CHWC

Abby holds a BS and Ms Ed in Exercises Science. She has over 20 years of experience teaching health education, group exercise, yoga, and personal training. She has taught at the university and community college levels and directed a variety of community fitness programs. She has been working with W.I.T.S. in various rolls including mentoring online programs, continuing education creation, leading webinars, and teaching in-person certifications since 2004. She believes everyone deserves to feel and live their best life and is passionate partnering with others to help them get there.

Abby Eastman MSEd, ACSM Exercise Physiologist/EIM II, CHWC, E-RYT200