W.I.T.S. – Certified Personal Training

Personal Training Certifications

Successful Certified Personal Trainers need more than book knowledge. Therefore, it is crucial to know the effects of exercise and how the body will react to it. In addition you need the practical mastery of the skills in assessing a client and how to take competent steps to physically and mentally get your client to the promise land of measurable lifestyle results. Learn More

NCCA Accredited Program - Seal of Accreditation

Welcome to W.I.T.S. (World Instructor Training Schools)

The World Instructor Training Schools (W.I.T.S.) has been leading for 25 years to enhance public safety by developing and administering true health and fitness certification programs.  Furthermore, jobs in this industry are projected to grow 16% into 2021.  As a result, W.I.T.S. can certify you in personal training, group fitness, older adult and other disciplines in this industry.

The W.I.T.S. Certified Personal Trainer is the only organization to receive NCCA accreditation in the practical skills and the theoretical knowledge.  In addition, W.I.T.S. courses are at hundreds of neighborhood colleges and universities with college credits through the American Council on Education (www.acenet.edu).  Check out how we prepare our graduates for a solid career.

fitness trainer certification

What W.I.T.S. Students and Graduates Are Saying

“I believe that the Internship requirement by WITS is invaluable! It forced me into a real training environment with real clients. I worked with 5 different trainers and was exposed to different training styles as well as very varied client ability levels. I saw first-hand how to interact successfully with clients and to keep them moving through their exercises. The Internship gave me the confidence I needed when I first began working as a Personal Trainer – I was hired at the facility I interned at!!! Get Moving!” — Carole K.     View More Testimonials & References

Prevent Groin Pulls with These Exercises

By Joe Giandonato, MBA, MS, CSCS

Injuries of the groin muscles, or adductor muscles complex, are one of the most problematic issues in a number of sports. According to a 2007 report featured in the Sports Medicine Journal, groin injuries are most common in field sports such as rugby, soccer and ice hockey [1]. Groin overuse injuries are also relatively common in other field sports such as football and lacrosse.

The report identified core weakness as a possible underlying cause in groin pain in athletes & groin injuries, as coactivation, or simultaneous firing of the core musculature and adductors must occur during the athletic movements the adductors generate.

The adductor complex is a composed of an assemblage of muscles layered on top of one another, cordoning the inner thighs. They balance the pelvis during gait and as mentioned earlier, contribute to athletic movements, which include twisting, turning, and pivoting, they are also key players in pelvic stability, such as activities of daily living which include climbing stairs and picking up objects. (more…)

Tiny but Mighty – The Strength Band

By Abby Eastman

As new trends emerge in fitness, sadly, we often forget about staple equipment.  Strength Bands were made famous in rehabilitation settings and are often seen in group exercise classes, but they also deserve a prominent gym spot. With results much the same as traditional weight training, they are small and inexpensive yet mighty useful.

Off-hand, you might recall quickly some exercises that can be incorporated into a client’s training routine using bands.  From squats to bicep curls, the band provides versatile options for clients of all ages and training levels. When we dig deeper, you will find they provide even more innovative ways to diversify your client’s routine. Including but not limited to: (more…)

Introduction to Dumbbell Training

Believe it or not, dumbbell training has been around since ancient Greece. They used stone or metal that was carved to include a handle and weighed between 4 and 20 lbs. They were called halteres. The term dumbbell, however, is believed to have originated in England (Hedrick, 2020). Various types of dumbbells can be used with a single or a pair of dumbbells in a bent over row, bench press and more.

These include adjustable, fixed, and selectorized. no matter what style you use, dumbbells have many benefits, and these include:

Practical Advantages

  1. Low Cost
  2. Adaptability
  3. Can be used anywhere
  4. Suited for explosive training
  5. Little training space is required
  6. Can train all muscle groups
  7. Only need a relatively small number of dumbbells
  8. Safer than barbells on specific exercises
  9. Easier for individuals with injuries
  10. Easier to learn than barbell exercises

Physiological Advantages

  1. A more complex motor activity
  2. Opportunity to perform alternating movements
  3. Opportunity to perform single-arm movements
  4. Adds a balance requirement which works core muscles
  5. Stabilizing muscles are more active
  6. Reduces the potential for injury by enhancing joint stability
  7. Increases potential range of motion
  8. Adds variation to the training program (Hedrick, 2020)

Now that you know why using dumbbells is essential in a workout, let us look at how to incorporate them into your program. You can either incorporate dumbbells into an existing program or design a whole new program for your client. Either way, there are some necessary steps you will want to take.

  1. Decide on your philosophy of training.
  2. Establish your client’s goals.
  3. Use scientifically sound information and concrete guidelines (Hint: You can find these in a W.I.T.S. course).
  4. Use the concept of periodization: The practice of dividing training into specific cycles with each cycle targeting a specific physiological adaption.
  5. Incorporate training variables.
  6. Teach proper technique. Technique should always take precedence over intensity.

There are a plethora of dumbbell exercises out there. These dumbbell exercises can work all the major muscles for the full body effect.  Those exercises can work the tricep muscles, upper arms, and develop full range of motion.

Almost any exercise your client is doing on a machine can be done with a set of dumbbells. Add in simple variations on each exercise, and you have just quadrupled the movements you can do. You can work on muscle isolating movements like bicep curls or compound movements that work multiple muscles at one time, like squats. You can even put the two together and have your client do a squat-bicep curl move.

“This is the interesting part of designing training programs because it is part science and part art—art in the sense that you can use your creativity to design what you believe is the best approach to improving athletic performance. Although the art aspect provides room for creativity, the vast majority of a training program should be based on science” (Hedrick, 2020)

So take a look at the programs you are designing and ask yourself where can I add in some dumbbell training? Want to know more about programming, various exercises for upper body, weight loss aspects and more? Sign up now for the Introduction to Dumbbell Training in the W.I.T.S. Store

Check out this great Infographic about guidelines of resistance training

Stop by the W.I.T.S. store to check out the Introduction to Dumbbell Training course and our other C.E.C. offerings. Check back in often as we are beginning to develop a new line of courses specific to trainers’ current needs.

References

Hedrick, Allen, (2020).  Dumbbell training. (2nd ed.). Human Kinetics.

Presenters Bio

Martha Swirzinski, Ed.D.Martha Swirzinski

Martha holds an Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction and a master’s degree in Kinesiology. She has over 25 years of experience in teaching exercise science, health education, and personal training. She teaches in higher education and develops courses worldwide for various organizations. She has been with W.I.T.S. in multiple roles, including mentoring online programs, course development, webinars, and teaching since 2009.